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Starting a new job search can be a daunting prospect, especially if you’ve been in your current role for a while.
However - whether it be a change in career path or a desire to progress and challenge yourself, finding a new job could be the best thing you do this year.
Conducting your job search shouldn’t be a hassle and providing you stay focused you will have every chance of landing your dream role. Here are some key steps to help:

Get motivated for change

If you’re thinking about changing jobs make sure you’re absolutely clear on what your motivation for change is. Start your search with a clear idea on what you are looking for from your new job role.
If you are looking for an increase in salary, consult salary checkers to get an idea of what you are worth.
If you’re looking to diversify your skills, pick up the phone and contact the relevant people to determine whether a new role would suit you.

Know your strengths and skills

If your current role doesn’t utilise your strengths, passions and skills have a think about what they are and what jobs would align well with them.
Do you work better individually or in a team? Do you work well to deadlines? These are the questions to consider right at the beginning of your job search.

Focus your job search

Understanding what your skills and strengths are will allow you to refine and focus your job search further.
Use job search engines to search for jobs with keywords that suit you and match your interests. This part is all about shortlisting relevant positions that suit you.

Connect with your contacts

Over your career and throughout university you will have amassed hundreds of potential connections – either online, at work or socially.
With a growing number of companies tending to rely heavily on employee referrals it’s vital to network effectively and properly.
You never know which contact may be able to help you with your job search or put you in touch with someone who can.

Create a list of desired companies

There is no harm in writing down a few organisations that you have a desire to work for, if anything this focuses your job search further.
Take it to the next level by identifying who is responsible for hiring and contact them directly asking if they have any job openings in the future and what skills and experience they look for.
Take a look at LinkedIn and type in the role you’d like – does it exist at that company? If not, is there scope for exploratory discussions with the department head? If you don’t ask, you’ll never know…

Target your resume and cover letter

Showing that you have understood the job role and understand the organisation demonstrates that you could be a good fit. Address your CV directly to who deals with recruitment where possible, this shows that you have taken the due diligence during your job search.

Use all opportunities the internet presents

Registering on job boards will almost certainly be beneficial to your job search. Another useful trick you can utilise is to set up email notifications for jobs that match your skills and interests.
Research recruitment agencies and give them a call – they are best placed to provide advice that is specific to your industry, and they have the insider know-how to boost your chances of securing interviews.
Make sure that your LinkedIn profile contains keywords within your job title and experiences. As well as this, ensure that an up-to-date version of your CV is visible on your profile.

Look for hidden unadvertised jobs

It’s time to use your initiative and be hands-on when looking for a new career. With research suggesting that many jobs aren’t advertised it’s up to you to get your name out there by sending speculative applications to employers that you have targeted.
 Advertised jobs receive hundreds, if not thousands, of applications so investing time in finding unadvertised job vacancies will mean you have less competition and stand a better chance of an interview.

Perfect your interview technique

If you have been in your current role for a substantial period of time it is unlikely that you will be well versed in the art of interviews.

Research the company and try your best to predict what kind of questions they might ask about your experiences and achievements listed on your CV. Practicing your answers aloud, no matter how pointless it feels, will also benefit you greatly.

Prepare your own questions

Your questions at the end of an interview are an opportunity to really show off how suited you are to the job role.

Ask questions that evidently show how much effort you have put into your interview preparation. Your questions at the end of an interview are an opportunity to show how much you know about the employer's business, use them.